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The Rebirth of HF

HF stands for “high frequency” and is usually used to refer to signals with frequencies in the range of 3 MHz to 30 MHz, although in many cases the practical definition of HF has be extended down to frequencies as low as 1.5 MHz.


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Radio Over Satellite Solutions

Communication requirements and channels have evolved drastically in the age of globalization and it has become imperative to enhance connectivity between organizations, world-wide teams, headquarters and employees on the field. Radio communications play an essential role in this, especially in public safety, fleet operations, mining and military applications.


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Gate Drive Measurement Considerations

One of the primary purposes of a gate driver is to enable power switches to turn on and off faster, improving rise and fall times. Faster switching enables higher efficiency and higher power density, reducing losses in the power stage associated with high slew rates. However, as slew rates increase, so do measurement and characterization uncertainty.


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The Rebirth of HF

HF stands for “high frequency” and is usually used to refer to signals with frequencies in the range of 3 MHz to 30 MHz, although in many cases the practical definition of HF has be extended down to frequencies as low as 1.5 MHz.


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TRL Calibration of a VNA

Thru-Reflect-Line calibration has a number of advantages over the SOLT method often used in VNA calibration. For SOLT calibration, the standards must be accurately characterized. The opens and shorts might be characterized by electromagnetic simulation of the physical design or have associated one-port “data-base” files obtained by highly precise measurement.


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NewSpace Terminal Testing Challenges and Considerations

Today’s satellite communication systems combine features from legacy cellular networks and emerging wireless technologies. New constellations are under development that attempt to provide ubiquitous mobility and internet networks via satellites, ground stations and user terminals (Figure 1). Each link in the supply chain presents unique challenges for R&D, production and deployment for both the components and system development.


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