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Chris Marki

Chris Marki

While at Marki Microwave, Christopher has served as Director of Research and has been responsible for the design and commercialization of many of Marki's fastest growing product lines including filters, couplers and power dividers.

Into the wild blog yonder…

December 2, 2010
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Christopher F. Marki received his B.S.E.E. from Duke University in 2002 and his M.S.E.E. and Ph.D. from University of California, San Diego in 2004 and 2007, respectively. While in graduate school, Christopher studied high speed fiber optics and consulted for San Diego start-up Ziva Corporation. Following graduate school, Christopher decided to forego a life in Photonics and opted, instead, to work with his father at Marki Microwave and learn the “family business” of microwave mixers. While at Marki Microwave, Christopher has served as Director of Research and has been responsible for the design and commercialization of many of Marki’s fastest growing product lines including filters, couplers and power dividers. Dr. Marki has authored and co-authored numerous journal and conference publications and frequently serves as an IEEE reviewer for Photonics Technology Letters and Journal of Lightwave Technology.   This blog is part of Microwave Journal's guest blog series.

To comment or ask Christopher a question, use the comment link at the bottom of the entry.

 

 

December 2, 2010

Marki 

 

 

 

 

 

Ever since I began learning science and engineering at Duke, I was always struck with the sullen reminder that engineers are generally viewed by laymen as outcasts who know strange things and behave in even stranger ways. I’ve always hated this mischaracterization because I find, almost invariably, that scientifically minded people tend to be some of the most amazingly well rounded and talented people I know. I began writing this blog to dispel some of this bad press and to provide some “engineering-centric” content along the way. Ultimately, my goal was to provide a forum where real engineers could express their thoughts about both absurd and important scientific issues, free of the pressures of selling products and services.

As my time with mwjournal.com has now come to an end, I am proud to say that this gambit has been well worth the trouble. As the traffic has proven, I am not the only one interested in things like patents, the World Cup, or Fantasy Football. Our shared interest in many of these topics fostered some excellent discussions and I would like to thank all the readers who joined me in the discourse, even the ones who disagreed with me!

So now what? Well, I’ve thought about this extensively, and the only reasonable solution I can muster is to join forces with other bloggers. Yeah, I think my column is ok, but I am just one man with one opinion, and writing articles doesn’t pay the bills (mixers do). The logical solution, therefore, is to join up with other engineers in the industry, all bonafide experts and authorities on their own, and share in the mind-meld, so to speak.

So with this last Microwave Journal blog, I am pleased to announce that I am joining a new online community called rfblogger.com where I will blog alongside other industry leaders and experts and continue what mwjournal.com has so graciously helped me to start. By joining rfblogger, we will be able to leverage the expertise and opinions of many great minds, and hopefully create thought-provoking and entertaining content for the RF and microwave community as a whole.

The website has launched with contributions from the oscillator gurus at Wenzel Associates and the instrumentation wizards at Holzworth Instrumentation. I am constantly in awe of the talents of these engineers and I look forward to creating great RF-centric content with them. The long term goal is to gather a full stable of RF experts to contribute regularly to the rfblogger website such that we can create a knowledge base of information for the industry. I hope you’ll follow me to rfblogger.com, I can’t wait to see what kind of crazy ideas we come up with…

 


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