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Industry News / Subsystems and Systems

Lockheed Martin Demonstrates Advanced Intelligence Collection Capabilities

September 11, 2009
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The power of one multi-intelligence aircraft collecting, correlating then distributing diverse types of intelligence to those who needed it was demonstrated by Lockheed Martin during the US Army's C4ISR On-The-Move exercise. Lockheed Martin’s Airborne Multi-intelligence Laboratory (AML) demonstrated how its onboard sensors, interacting with the Army’s intelligence and battle command enterprises can dramatically improve the speed and quality of situational awareness available to friendly forces.

“This is a significant step forward in exploring the true potential of correlating various types of intelligence. We demonstrated that our open architecture, multi-INT test bed can link airborne sensors directly to defense command networks,” said Jim Quinn, a Vice President with Lockheed Martin’s IS&GS-Defense. “The benefits of this exercise are clear: improved situational awareness, enhanced air to ground coordination and the ability to deliver critical battlefield information rapidly to tactical users.”

During the exercise, the AML flew support missions for the Army’s Intelligence and Information Warfare Directorate (I2WD), and was one of several sensors collecting information to support friendly forces. In a matter of seconds, the AML acquired high quality intelligence with its onboard sensors, relayed that intelligence to its ground station, which then transmitted the data immediately to the Army’s Distributed Common Ground System for further analysis and distribution to the Army’s battle command system.

The AML was unique in that it was able to collect radio signals and then immediately confirm its targets with an advanced High Definition Electro-Optical / Infrared sensor from FLIR systems. The US Army's C4ISR On-The-Move exercise was conducted at the end of August at Lakehurst Naval Engineering Air Station and Fort Dix, NJ.

The AML, a modified Gulfstream III business jet, is predicated on advancing the science and the art of multi-INT net-centric warfare. Designed with an open architecture for interchangeability and experimentation, the AML provides a readily reconfigurable platform to rapidly test, explore, identify and validate how multiple sensors and onboard systems interact, and how to best apply them for use in military and non-military markets.


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