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Industry News / Subsystems and Systems

Mercury Computer Systems Introduces 16 GHz Digital Frequency Discriminator

November 11, 2011
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Mercury Computer Systems Inc., a provider of commercially developed ISR subsystems for defense prime contractors, will debut its new FM021814 digital frequency discriminator (DFD) with phase modulation on pulse (PMOP) detection at the 48th Annual AOC International Symposium and Convention November 13 to 16 in Washington, DC, in booth 1323. This detector uniquely blends the ability to generate phase and frequency information data streams, providing highly reliable and accurate information instantaneously. Mercury’s Microwave and Digital Solutions group is a leader in software-defined, Application Ready Subsystems™ (ARS™) that detect, deceive and defeat hostile signals on land, at sea and in the air.

“Radar warning, electronic counter measures (ECM) and electronics intelligence (ELINT) systems rely on critical measurements to identify threats, map the electronic battlefield and ultimately implement deceptive countermeasures,” said Art Humason, Technical Director at Mercury Computer Systems. “Mercury leveraged more than 30 years of expertise in analog, mixed signal and digital technologies to integrate two critical measurements into this new broadband detector. The measurements provide precise information in near real-time, significantly improving the ability to anticipate threats and protect our warfighters.”

Mercury’s digital frequency discriminators provide a compelling competitive advantage in terms of performance, size and cost for critical defense applications. The new FM021814 monitors the entire 2 to 18 GHz band (a full 16 GHz) instantaneously and measures the frequency of pulses as short as 50 ns, with an RMS frequency accuracy of < 3 MHz. Phase data can be sampled “on command” at 80 MHz with 8-bit resolution or delivered as continuously streaming information at 40 MHz. Streaming data allows users to detect PMOP with extremely low latency, while buffered data allows the user to analyze the information with greater resolution and accuracy.


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